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"Lord Haw Haw" (William Joyce) MP3 & Wav Sounds & Pictures






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William Joyce, aka "Lord Haw Haw", an American citizen whose obtaining of a British passport in 1938 while a member of Sir Oswald Mosley's British Union of Fascists ultimately resulted in his being hanged for treason by the British, signs on shortwave stations Bremen and DXB on the 31 meter shortwave band. Strong arguments have been made over the years that Joyce should not have been found guilty of treason, since the prosecution's argument that he owed allegiance to Britain during the period of time he was in possession of a British passport was a questionable one that should not have resulted in a guilty verdict. While at least one American broadcaster for the Axis who was found guilty of treason has since been justly exonerated, the fact that the naturalized American citizen Joyce broadcast propaganda targeted to Americans which met American criteria for treason makes it certain that were he not tried for treason in Britain, he would have been in America - the difference would likely have been the punishment he would have received for the offense, since no other American broadcaster of propaganda in WWII was sentenced to death.

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Lord Haw-Haw signs off from Station Bremen and Station DXB.

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A December 13th 1939 broadcast were Joyce cites a report by "The New York Times" that the British Cruiser "Exeter" had been badly damaged by the German Pocket Battleship "Graf Spee" and was heading to Port Stanley in the Faulkland Islands to run itself aground and utlize its guns as a coastal battery there.

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An April 9th, 1940 "News in English" broadcast where Joyce reads a series of news bulletins from the German Supreme Command regarding the invasions of Norway and Denmark that had occured just that morning. Especial note should be given to the incredible promise of the German Minister to Norway that "Germany does not intend to infringe the territorial integrity or political independence of the Kingdom of Norway, either now or in the future".

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The conclusion of the above broadcast, where an explanation of what happened is given. Here the propaganda starts in thick, starting by harking to British occupation of territories in her history for the purposes of her protection and comparing those instances to Germany's actions. Also are given communiques on individual unit movements; bombing raids on the British port Scapa Flow; Danish political developments; Swedish reactions.

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An excerpt from the above: in a classic Nazi propaganda moment, Churchill is claimed to now understand that he is facing a force characterized as "the human embodiment of that cleansing atmospheric phenomenon -- the thunderstorm".

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An excerpt from the same as the above: Germany demands Denmark accept her "protection".

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A broadcast of Lord Haw-Haw from around mid-April 1940 that picks up in the midst of "News in English", where the topics are German occupation of fortresses in Oslo; demobilization of Danish forces in occupied Denmark; allegations of German munitions being shipped into Sweden; and the British invasion of the port of Narvik, Norway. There then follows "Schmidt & Smith", an inadvertantly comical propaganda skit featuring a hypothetical discussion between an Englishman and a German in a Swiss bar about the disparate nature of each country's current war news.

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A broadcast aired just after the conclusion of the German invasion of Norway. Topics include the March 12th conclusion of the Russo-Finnish War; Winston Churchill's ascendency, personal activities, military actions and speeches; the German commerce raider "Altmark"; the events leading up to and following the invasions of Norway and Denmark; the war in review. Particular psychological devices make their appearance here that become much more apparent and pronounced in later broadcasts.

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A broadcast that took place about a week after the German invasion of Holland and Belgium, where gloating is brought to a level that makes this a particularly important as well as interesting broadcast. It consists of a review of the military and political aftermath of these invasions in those two countries; veiled threats that similar consequences will be meted out to other small countries that enjoin the Allies; Allied loses; the ongoing disembarkation of the British Expeditionary Force from Europe (Dunkirk is not mentioned, likely deliberately); questioning of the British explanation for this withdrawal, which questions are directed towards the British people; the imminence of Italian involvement in the war. Here also is the first direct derogatory mention of the Jewish people, by means of an attack on Churchill, who is said to be the "darling of Jewish finance". Take note of particular psychological devices that are used throughout this broadcast: how Joyce's intonation becomes especially Churchillian during certain remarks, particularly those that parody British statements, mention military setbacks or quotes certain phrases used by Churchill himself; the use of dramatic pauses; the insinuating use of epithets to refer to Churchill, sometime without ever naming hime, throughout entire broadcast segments; the characterization of Churchill as a dictator; the subtle inference that the British public is inadequate through the use of statements which accuse British authorities of considering them so as a rationale for their announcements and actions -- they are all prototypical examples of more pronounced psychological devices used by Joyce in later broadcasts.

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This is the broadcast where Joyce gives the details of how the news broke that France had surrendered to Germany and ultimately signed an armistice during the month of June 1940. It also makes certain by a variety of devices that Churchill and the British people get the message that what had just happened to France was about to happen to Britain. It's construct is dramatic, suspenseful and smug, and a classic example of Nazi propaganda. The source media for this broadcast was in truly terrible condition and took considerable time and effort to digitally restore. The result is this file, which enables you to hear the broadcast, clearly and in its entirety, for the very first time, and preserves one of the great landmark pieces of propaganda broadcasting history.

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Another extroardinary moment in propaganda broadcasting, and for psychological warfare in particular, aired about one week following the preceding broadcast above. The "you're next" threat that concluded the previous broadcast is developed into a theme during this propaganda piece. It is invested which a particular sarcastic attitude which focuses on British institutions, policies and society, and is intended as much to demoralize and disinform the British people as it is to propagandize listeners in all other countries within its broadcast range. In this vein, mention is also made of the British attack on French warships at the port of Oran after France capitulated to Germany; the "revelations" regarding Britain's plans for and conduct of the war contained in the French archives captured by Germany; the "Freak (Free) French Government" in exile in Britain. The source media for this broadcast, too, was in poor condition and has been extensively digitally restored.

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A fanciful tale spun to excite one-wonders-what about British women purchasing splinter-proof dresses and hats to wear during bombing raids.

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A broadcast where Joyce quotes the Italian newspaper "Tribuna" which denies (accurate) reports that Germany was intending to invade the Balkans, broadcast sometime during the first few months of 1941.

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The first part of the entire "Germany Calling" broadcast to North America, 8:15 PM EST, December 28, 1941. It begins with "News in English", that being the War news of the day from a German and Axis perspective, preliminary to William Joyce's taking to the microphone.

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The second part of the entire "Germany Calling" broadcast, December 28, 1941, where "Lord Haw-Haw" takes the mike and aims his comments at the supposed folly of American-British cooperation and the alliance of Roosevelt and Churchill specific to that. Churchill had just celebrated Christmas at the White House, addressed a joint session of the US Congress the day after, and was at that moment on his way to Canada to bolster morale there, hence the importance of Joyce's broadcasting this message to North America at that moment. Other countries are not exempt, however, from Joyce's instigatory insinuations - Australia and New Zealand are as much assured that Britain and Churchill are using them and selling them out as Canada is assured that Great Britain is selling them out to America. Japanese victories are rubbed into the wounds of the Allies and used to suggest an outcome of the war that events would later prove incorrect. The fate of the British warships "Prince of Wales" and "Repulse" are predictably cited as proof that the British Navy was impotent, overstretched, and not possibly able to help a reeling American Pacific fleet.

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An excerpt from the above broadcast, where Joyce is introduced and delivers the first two sentences of his talk.

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William Joyce's last broadcast, aired April 30th, 1945. He's hit the bottle hard during this one, and it's notable how his slurred speech is often punctuated by a strong Irish accent picked up and put to use on this occasion as a result of having lived in Ireland for many years. It amounts on a personal level to a claim of "I didn't do it", explaining that all he ever wanted to do was to help create a mutually beneficial relationship between Germany and England, and especially to warn Britain and the world of the threat of Soviet Russia - indeed, despite his pathetic state, he does manage to make disturbingly accurate predictions about the future of relations with the Soviet Union. On a propaganda level, it purports to be a rational explanation for the supposedly rational actions of the Third Reich, and ends with the prepostorous conclusion that the fate that had befallen Nazi Germany was the result of an unfortunate misunderstanding by Britain of the nation's true intentions. Passing mention is also made of Poland and the San Francisco Conference. Take note of his continual use of the phrase "I can only say" - it's used in a number of ways to achieve different purposes, not least of which is to give the impression that he was somehow just a mouthpiece, not responsible for what he said.

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Drunk, Lord Haw Haw signs-off from his last broadcast.

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The BBC's Wynford Vaughan-Thomas' mock William Joyce/"Lord Haw Haw" "Germany Calling" Broadcast of 5/4/45, transmitted moments after Joyce had escaped the studio.

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Pictures


The Face of Bigotry
LordHaw-HawTrenchCoat.jpg

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The Face of Bigotry
WilliamJoyceBlackshirtRally.jpg

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The Face of Bigotry
William_Joyce_jk.jpg

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All sound files digitized by and (C) (P) 1996 J. C. Kaelin, Jr..





© 1996-2014, J. C. Kaelin, Jr.. All Rights Reserved.

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